Introduction:

Eating well is an important part of your treatment and can help you feel better. A new diet is essential part to your treatment process. Not only will it help you feel better, it can also help you avoid complications of your renal disease such as fluid overload, high blood potassium, bone disease, and weight loss. Because every individual is different and their needs unique, the following dietary advice should be given depending on a number of factors and discussion with your renal dietician. These factors include: stage of your renal disease, type of treatment you are on, laboratory results, and presence of other medical conditions.

Kidney function is essential for removing the waste material from food that you eat. The kidneys excrete a dietary protein called urea, as well as sodium, potassium,and phosphate. These substances can build up in the body if kidney function is impaired. Following a strict diet can lessen this accumulation and its effects.

Kidney failure Patients should monitor and limit their intake of the following:

  • Potassium
  • Phosphate
  • Sodium
  • Fluids

Phosphorus is a mineral that healthy kidneys get rid of in the urine. In kidneys that are failing, phosphorus builds up in the blood and may cause many problems including muscle aches and pains, brittle, easily broken bones, calcification of the heart, skin, joints, and blood vessels. To keep your phosphorus levels in check, consider the following tips:

1. Limit high phosphorus foods such as:

  • Meats, poultry, dairy and fish (you should have 1 serving of 7-8 ounces)
  • Milk and other dairy products like cheese ( you should have one 4 oz. serving)

2. Avoid high phosphorus foods such as:

  • Lima Beans, Black Beans, Red Beans, Black-eyed Peas, WhiteBeans, and Garbanzo Beans
  • Dark, whole or unrefined grains
  • Refrigerator doughs like Pillsbury
  • Dried vegetables and fruits
  • Chocolate
  • Dark colored sodas

3. Don’t forget to take your phosphate binders with meals and snacks.

Your doctor will prescribe a medication called a phosphate binder which will be some type of polymer gel or calcium medication. You need to take your phosphate binder as prescribed by your doctor.  Often you will take a phosphate binder with every meal and snack.

4. Usually your diet is limited to 1000 mg of phosphorus per day.

Don’t forget to take your phosphate binders with meals and snacks.

Your doctor will prescribe a medication called a phosphate binder which will be some type of polymer gel or calcium medication. You need to take your phosphate binder as prescribed by your doctor. Often you will take a phosphate binder with every meal and snack.

Controlling your Potassium

Potassium is an element that is necessary for the body to keep a normal water balance between the cells and body fluids. All foods contain some potassium, but some contain larger amounts.Normal kidney function will remove potassium through urination. Kidneys that are not functioning properly cannot remove the potassium in the urine, so it builds up in the blood. This can be very dangerous to your heart. High potassium can cause irregular heart beats and can even cause the heart to stop if the potassium levels get to high.

Typically, there are no symptoms for someone with a high potassium level. If you are concerned about your potassium level, check with your doctor, and follow the tips below.

• Usually a renal patient’s diet should be limited to 2000 mg of potassium each day.

The following foods are high in potassium:

BananasOrange JuiceAvocadoPrunesOrangesPrune Juice
TomatoesTomato JuiceTomato Sauce
CantaloupeTomato PureeHoneydew Melon
NutsPapayaChocolate
Red BeansMilkWhite Beans
Lima BeansGarbanzo BeansBlack Beans
LentilsSplit peasBaked Beans

Specially Prepared Potatoes:

  • Peel and slice into 1/8 inch pieces.
  • Soak 1 cup potatoes in 5 cups of water for 2 hours.
  • Drain and rinse and drain.
  • Cook in a large amount of water.
  • Drain and mash, fry or serve plain.

Controlling your Sodium

Sodium, or sodium chloride, is an element that is used by all living creatures to regulate the water content in the body. Usually a sodium restriction comes in the form of “No Added Salt.” This is necessary because a greater intake of sodium will result in poorly controlled blood pressure and excessive thirst which can lead to difficulty adhering to the fluid restrictions in your diet.

To limit your sodium, you should:

  • Avoid table salt and any seasonings that end with the word “salt”
  • Avoid salt substitutes (they contain potassium)
  • Avoid salty meats such as bacon, ham, sausage, hot dogs, lunch meats, canned meats, or bologna
  • Avoid salty snacks such as cheese curls, salted crackers, nuts, and chips
  • Avoid canned soups, frozen dinners, and instant noodles
  • Avoid bottled sauces, pickles, olives, and MSG

Controlling Your Fluid Intake

People on dialysis often have decreased urine output, so increased fluid in the body can put unnecessary pressure on the person’s heart and lungs.

  • A fluid allowance for individual patients is calculated on the basis of ‘urine plus 500ml.’ The 500 ml covers the loss of fluids through the skin and lungs.
  • Most patients will not urinate as much once they begin Kidney failure. Those who produce a lot of urine may be able to drink more than those who do not produce urine.
  • Between each dialysis treatment, patients are expected to gain a little weight due to the water content in foods (fruits and vegetables).
  • The amount of fluid in a typical day’s meal (excluding fluids such as water, tea, etc.) is at least 500 ml and therefore expected daily weight gain is between 0.4 – 0.5kg.
  • To control fluid intake, patients should:

Not drink more than what your doctor orders (usually 4 cups of fluid each day)

Controlling Your Protein

Protein is important to aid in growth and maintenance of body tissue. Protein also plays a role in fighting infection, healing of wounds, and provides a source of energy to the body.

  • You should make sure to eat 7-8 ounces of protein every day. Foods that are high in protein include beef, pork, veal, chicken, turkey, fish, seafood, and eggs.
  • 1 egg is equal to 1 ounce of protein, and three ounces of protein is comparable to the size of a deck of cards.

Fast Food Facts

Quick-service restaurants provide us with a quick, easy, inexpensive bite when we’re pressed for time. Americans love fast food and there are so many items to choose from! A lot of chains are now offering lower-fat options and if chosen wisely, fast foods can be healthy AND fit into your renal diet.

If you are a regular through the drive-up window or frequently dine in at fast food restaurants, keep these tips in mind.

Some Ordering Tips:

Burgers and sandwiches are high in sodium because they are pre-salted. This may be difficult for the quick-service restaurant to omit the salt. Be sure to ask before you order.

  • Remember that fries and baked potatoes are rich in potassium. But if you can’t imagine a bur- ger without the fries, order a small serving and ask for unsalted, if possible.
  • Keep in mind that catsup, mustard, and pickles are all high in sodium. Keep condiments, spe- cial sauces and dressings to a minimum. Request that these toppings be served “on the side” so you can control the amount.
  • Beverage sizes typically are large or “super-size” and can contribute to fluid overload if the entire beverage is consumed. Order a small beverage and be sure to count it as part of your fluid allowance.
  • Balance fast food items with other food choices. As you order, consider the other foods you have eaten or will eat during the day.
  • Choose broiled, steamed or grilled items over deep fat fried foods. To trim the fat from fried items, order the regular variety instead of the extra crispy and remove the skin before eating. Removing the skin also lowers the sodium content since most batters and coatings usually in- clude seasonings rich in sodium.

The huge variety of vegetables and fruits can provide you with vitamins A and C, folic acid and fiber. Be careful though, a trip to the salad bar can provide you with more fat and calories than a burger and fries! There are many salad bar items that can easily fit into your renal diet. Below is a list of items to assist you in choosing sensibly from any salad bar.

Fast Food Facts

Chinese

Egg Rolls

Dim Sum Potstickers Steamed Rice

Stir-fry Vegetable Dishes- without sauces

Thai

Chicken or shrimp in kabob-type dishes- ask for sauce on the side

Spring Rolls

Steamed Rice

Pad Thai Noodles- no nuts

Grilled fish and chicken dishes- again ask for sauces on the side

Japanese

Sashimi and sushi- no California rolls with avocado

Tempura- pass on the dipping sauce, and skip the sweet potato

Grilled fish or chicken- ask for sauce on the side

Note: In all Asian restaurants, and in most restaurants, avoid the soups. They are all made from canned or dried stock and have very high sodium content and add extra fluid to your daily allowance. Also, avoid the noodles or dishes cooked in broth- they will be quite salty.

Dining Out for the Dialysis Patient

Eating out in restaurants can be difficult when you are on dialysis. Some excellent resources are found in the NFK Publication “Dining Out with Confidence.” If you have a favorite restaurant, ask the manager for a copy of the menu to take to your unit dietitian and they can help you make good choices.

Italian Food

Italian restaurants offer a lot of items suitable for the renal diet. The trick here is to ask for the sauce on the side. The red based sauces have potassium and the white sauces are high in phosphorus. You can vary the sauces and the types of pasta to make interesting meals. Pesto sauce is garlic, basil and oil and is a good alternative. Some clam and mussel sauces are not tomato or cream-based and are good choices for seafood lovers.

Salads and breads are great choices here; just ask for no olives and cheese. Remember to ask for the dressing on the side.

It is better to avoid the dishes like lasagna, cannelloni, ravioli and similar items as they contain high sodium, high potassium, and high phosphorus ingredients. Most Italian restaurants also offer some type of grilled chicken as an addition to their pasta dish. Have the chicken, salad and bread for your meal and take the pasta home and have with your own bread and salad for lunch the next day.

Asian Restaurants

These are difficult places to dine because of the high sodium contents. Chinese restaurants are the most difficult because of the large number of mixed dishes with soy, hoisin, and sweet and sour sauces. They all contain salt and/or MSG. Thai foods generally have more spices and less sodium, frequently you can ask for sauces on the side. Japanese restaurants will also serve more spiced foods and cook less with sodium.

CONCLUSION

When you eat out the sodium content will be higher than if you were eating at home. Remember to stay within your nutritional and fluid requirements. Try chewing gum, hard candy, breath sprays, etc. to help control the thirst so that you keep your weight gain to less than 5 percent of your dry weight. Be espe- cially careful of potassium overload if you choose high potassium food. Just have one serving, and only a small portion. A very high potassium meal can lead to potassium overload that can affect your heartbeat. So don’t eat tomato sauce, avocado, potato and banana cream pie in the same meal, your heart can’t take this much potassium.

Don’t hesitate to ask about the ingredients if the dish is unfamiliar to you. Ask your server to find out if they will prepare your food without adding salt. Always remember that you are the customer and enjoy!

Moderation

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasizes the importance of eating a variety of foods. This applies to dialysis patients, too. You can enjoy all foods in moderation while following a renal diet. One of the guidelines states: “Be sensible: Enjoy all foods, just don’t overdo it.”

We Encourage You To:

  • Slow down while eating. It takes 20 minutes to send the signal that you’ve had enough to eat.
  • Stop eating when full. Patients should walk away from the table feeling that they can eat a little more.
  • Have one small helping of that chocolate cake and enjoy every bite.
  • Enjoy that piece of lasagna twice as much. Eat half in the restaurant and take the rest home to enjoy the next day.

Italian Food

Italian restaurants offer a lot of items suitable for the renal diet. The trick here is to ask for the sauce on the side. The red based sauces have potassium and the white sauces are high in phosphorus. You can vary the sauces and the types of pasta to make interesting meals. Pesto sauce is garlic, basil and oil and is a good alternative. Some clam and mussel sauces are not tomato or cream-based and are good choices for seafood lovers.

Salads and breads are great choices here; just ask for no olives and cheese. Remember to ask for the dressing on the side.

It is better to avoid the dishes like lasagna, cannelloni, ravioli and similar items as they contain high sodium, high potassium, and high phosphorus ingredients. Most Italian restaurants also offer some type of grilled chicken as an addition to their pasta dish. Have the chicken, salad and bread for your meal and take the pasta home and have with your own bread and salad for lunch the next day.

Asian Restaurants

These are difficult places to dine because of the high sodium contents. Chinese restaurants are the most difficult because of the large number of mixed dishes with soy, hoisin, and sweet and sour sauces. They all contain salt and/or MSG. Thai foods generally have more spices and less sodium, frequently you can ask for sauces on the side. Japanese restaurants will also serve more spiced foods and cook less with sodium.

CONCLUSION

When you eat out the sodium content will be higher than if you were eating at home. Remember to stay within your nutritional and fluid requirements. Try chewing gum, hard candy, breath sprays, etc. to help control the thirst so that you keep your weight gain to less than 5 percent of your dry weight. Be espe- cially careful of potassium overload if you choose high potassium food. Just have one serving, and only a small portion. A very high potassium meal can lead to potassium overload that can affect your heartbeat. So don’t eat tomato sauce, avocado, potato and banana cream pie in the same meal, your heart can’t take this much potassium.

Don’t hesitate to ask about the ingredients if the dish is unfamiliar to you. Ask your server to find out if they will prepare your food without adding salt. Always remember that you are the customer and enjoy!

Moderation

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasizes the importance of eating a variety of foods. This applies to dialysis patients, too. You can enjoy all foods in moderation while following a renal diet. One of the guidelines states: “Be sensible: Enjoy all foods, just don’t overdo it.”

We Encourage You To:

  • Slow down while eating. It takes 20 minutes to send the signal that you’ve had enough to eat.
  • Stop eating when full. Patients should walk away from the table feeling that they can eat a little more.
  • Have one small helping of that chocolate cake and enjoy every bite.
  • Enjoy that piece of lasagna twice as much. Eat half in the restaurant and take the rest home to enjoy the next day.

THE GOAL

The goal for our patients should be a healthy lifestyle that can be maintained rather than a short-term diet that will most likely be abandoned and produce psychological discomfort

Causes of Paralysis?

In Brain stroke brain heals with the help of its natural healing process known as Neuroplasticity. Paralysis can be further classified into two categories like Brain Stroke and Spinal Injury. Therefore, two types of Spinal Injury are Complete and Incomplete Spinal Injury (SI). During initial 6 months of brain stroke a paralysis patient condition improves because of neuroplasticity. As a result, this recovery period of neuroplasticity slows down. Therefore, it is important for a patient to work on the brain for muscle mobility.

Types of Paralysis

For instance, 90% of paralysis happens when blood supply to the brain is blocked because of a blood clot in other words Ischemic Brain Stroke or when bleeding into the brain occurs because of blood vessel bursting in other words (Hemorrhagic Brain Stroke). But other 10% of paralysis is caused by Spinal Injury or other medical conditions like GB Syndrome, Polio and Poison etc.

Paralysis Symptoms

The symptoms of paralysis are different in each patient. It depends upon the area and the damage in Brain and Spinal cord.  Therefore, paralysis patient shows symptoms like:

  • Loss of muscle control.
  • Unable to use arms and legs properly.
  • Weakened eye sight.
  • Difficulty in eating.
  • Loss of balance or walking.
  • Loss of control in urine and stool.
  • Slow speech

Paralysis Treatment

At Sai Sanjivani in addition we use the natural healing process of the brain to stimulate its functions with the help of neuroplasticity. Therefore, our paralysis patient regains strength. Range of motion and movement in legs and arm within initial month of treatment.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroplasticity

https://medlineplus.gov/ischemicstroke.html

https://www.christopherreeve.org/living-with-paralysis/health/causes-of-paralysis

SUCCESS STORIES

CONTACT US

SAI SANJIVANI

B- 41 Derawal Nagar, Brahma Kumari Marg

Near G.D Goenka School

Nearest Metro Station - Model Town (yellow Line)

New Delhi - 110009

Customer Care Number - +91 7863800400

Book an Appointment? Chat with us